Turn Your Handy Skills Into a Career in Maintenance

People with experience in skilled trades play a vital role in the success of any residential or commercial rental property. In fact, without these trained personnel on-site on a regular basis, such properties simply couldn’t function. However, even if you possess handy maintenance skills, you might not recognize the scope of your opportunities. You also might fail to recognize the importance of certain additional, non-technical skills. In a diverse organization like Lewis Group of Companies, you’ll have the chance to lend your skills and capitalize on free in-house training from the best trainers in the industry. Here are some of the key talents that will help you thrive and advance as a maintenance technician.

Join a Lewis Maintenance Team

Drywall Maintenance and Repair

Drywall is by far the most common material used to finish interior walls on all kinds of properties. And proper installation and maintenance of this material calls for a professional touch. As a rule, master-level drywalling skill goes hand-in-hand with a drywall contractor’s license. License holders demonstrate their abilities through experience and/or testing. Lead drywallers also require assistance from a reliable team of supporting workers.

Painting

While not as technical as plumbing, electrical or drywall work, painting is still an indispensable sub-field in property maintenance. Periodically, new coats of paint must be applied to help ensure that properties shine in their best light. The same basic principle applies to touch-up paint jobs. And on a sizable complex or individual building, painting may take place on more or less a daily basis. Painters don’t typically require licensing, but they still must demonstrate their abilities and relevant work history.

Plumbing

Commercial and residential properties need plumbers to maintain a range of systems and devices. That includes everything from pipes, faucets, and toilets to dishwashers, hot water tanks, and garbage disposals. The same systems and devices must also undergo periodic troubleshooting and repair. Certified plumbers go through a rigorous training process designed to provide them with professional-level skills. They may also need to have those skills verified through appropriate testing.

Electrical

Like plumbers, electricians handle diverse tasks while maintaining various parts of a property’s major systems. In addition, they rely on an overlapping set of skills to carry out required troubleshooting and repair procedures. Professional electricians also share something else in common with professional plumbers. Namely, they go through in-depth training and in some cases undergo testing before receiving certification.

Appliance Maintenance

Appliance maintenance is a skill area open to both plumbers and electricians, or a maintenance technician of any kind. That’s true because any given appliance may contain plumbing-related components, as well as electrical components. Naturally, the same abilities are often needed to carry out proper repairs. To perform well in a property maintenance context, experience with a variety of appliances can be key.

Customer Service and Time Management

These two non-technical skills are also critical to a successful career in property maintenance. As on-site representatives, maintenance personnel often act as de facto representatives of Lewis. For this reason, they must know how to conduct themselves in a professional manner, even in trying circumstances. And as in any bustling workplace, effective time management is a must. That includes things such as proper scheduling, tracking of required tasks and an efficient work pace that doesn’t sacrifice quality.

Ready to begin? View the list of maintenance technician opportunities for at Lewis here.